24 November 2009

M o R Lecture

Find a comfortable seat in a quiet spot. Make sure you have access to a cups of tea and read the following,

LORD NEUBERGER OF ABBOTSBURY MR

RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES: CIVIC DUTY AND THE RULE OF LAW

2009 DENNING LECTURE


Look out for the quote,

"To paraphrase Lord Denning, the freedom of the just is worth little to them if they can be preyed upon indiscriminately."

And of course, Entick v Carrington

"“The great end, for which men entered into society, was to secure their property. That right is preserved sacred and incommunicable in all instances, where it has not been taken away or abridged by some public law for the good of the whole. The cases where this right of property is set aside by private law, are various. Distresses, executions, forfeitures, taxes etc are all of this description; wherein every man by common consent gives up that right, for the sake of justice and the general good. By the laws of England, every invasion of private property, be it ever so minute, is a trespass. No man can set his foot upon my ground without my license, but he is liable to an action, though the damage be nothing; which is proved by every declaration in trespass, where the defendant is called upon to answer for bruising the grass and even treading upon the soil. If he admits the fact, he is bound to show by way of justification, that some positive law has empowered or excused him. The justification is submitted to the judges, who are to look into the books; and if such a justification can be maintained by the text of the statute law, or by the principles of common law. If no excuse can be found or produced, the silence of the books is an authority against the defendant, and the plaintiff must have judgment.”

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